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J.F. Hoppenbrouwers (1819-1866) before treatment (fragment)
J.F. Hoppenbrouwers (fragment) after treatment


Restoration

Restoring an object clarifies the 'readability' and the original function of the object despite the irreversible effects of aging. 

Treating the object often goes hand in hand with the removal of materials added during previous ‘restorations’ which distort the image. New materials may also be added, for instance to conceal old damage. 

Restoration work generally has aesthetic implications.

  -  the removal of yellowed upper layers such as varnish, wax, etc.

 -  the removal of old discoloured overpainting and retouching

 -  the total or partial addition of missing elements

 -  the filling in and retouching of gaps in paint layers

 -  the application of finishing layers such as varnish



 Active conservation

 This relates to treatment of the object with the aim of preventing further deterioration or damage. This means all treatments focusing on optimising the preservation conditions of the artworks. 

The restorer may need to perform the following:  

-  removal of dirt, mould etc. 

-  fixation of loose parts or flaking paint into place

-  removal of inadequately functioning support constructions

-  application of new support constructions 

-  improvement of framing and ways of hanging up the paintings   

 

Passive conservation  

 -  monitoring and managing temperature, light and humidity

-  filtering contaminated air

-  preventing fire and break-ins

-  developing an emergency plan

-  correctly packaging art and supervising art transportation

-  informing everyone who handles artworks on correct procedure